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budget is up to 20% and the next decade is 30% of our budget. it takes away from education, infrastructure, other health and human service needs. so medicaid and the need to have flexibility is something we are go to go watch as we go forward. let me finish where i started. we need to address the rising costs of health care. i don't think the affordable care act does that. we have provided an opportunity with our health care exchange in utah is a model based on good principles that allows businesses to provide as a benefit and health with competitive forces and consumer control to, in fact, have an impact on the rising costs of health care. it may be imperfect, but it's a step in the right direction. again, the fundamental position i'm taking and we're taking in utah is that the free market works if you allow it. and takes politicians like myself and others to be disciplined and to give time for the marketplace to work. we sometimes are so anxious to fix the problem, that we don't let the marketplace make the adjustments necessary to get the right outcome. and again as i sa
'm grateful for his education and there is no comparison between the quality of this man and chuck hagel. they are in different sandboxes. i'm very grateful for people like this who we desperately need in times like this. >> we go to the independent line. this is doug, welcome to the conversation. caller: thanks for taking my call and thanks to c-span. i think the only one that had any sanity and knew the questions that were going to be asked. we did not get any answers to them. how is the decision made? what are the requirements? the independent said we should have a court that regardless who the president is they should not have a unilateral way to document nominate someone. people in this country don't know about the mddaa, the national defense thorgs act which allows the president to designate a person who he feels is a terrorist or supporting terrorist organizations to deprive him of life, liberty and not be able to go in front of a court. you can't say listen, you have the wrong person. we can be unilaterally detained. there is no question about, for instance, the propaganda guy th
research and education. cuts to military personnel and law enforcement. cuts that will cause jobs and do real harm to the american economy as it struggles to recover. and the reality is that we don't even have that much time. we only have nine legislative days left in february to address the issue. nine days to negotiate a trillion-dollar deal with the senate and the president. and instead of a meaningful plan to address the crisis that we need to avert, we have this nonsense before us today. this is no way to govern. the disturbing truth is that many republicans seem downright giddy when it comes to the sequester cuts. there is new story after new story of how we'll let the sequester take effect. the gentleman from georgia, dr. price, couldn't support these cuts fast enough. i was shocked. mr. speaker, it was only last week that the economic numbers for the fourth quarter of 2012 were released. unexpectedly we saw a contraction in those numbers, a contraction fueled by a massive reduction in defense spending. what do you know, huge cuts in government spending during a fragile economic r
and strong supporter of catholic education, i once again this year introduced a resolution honoring catholic schools. h.res. 46 expresses support for the vital contributions of the thousands of calt lick elementary and secondary schools -- catholic elementary and secondary schools in the united states and the key role they play in promoting and ensuring a brighter, stronger future for our nation. i'd like to thank the 28 members who co-sponsored this bipartisan resolution with me. since 1974 the national catholic education association, the united states conference of catholic bishops have organized and planned national catholic schools week. this year's theme, catholic schools raise the standards highlights recent initiatives undertaken by catholic schools across the country to strengthen the already exemplary standards. america's catholic schools produce graduates with the schools and integrity needed by our businesses, governments, and communities emphasizing a well-rounded educational experience in instilling the values of giving back to community and helping others. nearly every catholic
this imbalance, congress created the children's hospital graduate medical education program. this is a program that was created and has been sustained with bipartisan support. unfortunately the program is facing elimination. president obama's budget for the 2012 fiscal year called for elimination of the program, despite the positive results. i support getting rid of programs that are duplicative, unproven or unnecessary. especially with the budget pressures we're facing now. however chgme has a proven track record. over 40% of pediatricians in the united states are trained through chgme. 43% of those in subspecialties are trained through the program. the children's hospital of philadelphia runs the largest pediatric residency in the country. the residents will treat children in my community and then move across the country to practice in other communities. we need their expertise now more than ever. last congress i worked with commy democratic counterpart on the -- my democrat counterpart to renew the program. our legislation passed the house of representatives twice in the 112th congress, bot
. it's appropriate i do this at georgetown. as the product of jesuit education, as a catholic and as a beneficiary over the years of your outstanding faculty and staff and your important policy contributions that this university has made in a number of areas that affect people of this country. i'm truly honored to have this opportunity today. i've had a deep and abiding respect for georgetown throughout the almost 40 to 50 years that i've been involved in public service. and i have a deep respect for the generation of leaders that have gone forward from this campus to serve our nation. i just had the opportunity to meet with your cadets. some of the cadets in the rotc program. as someone who went through the rotc program at santa clara university and then ultimately served two years in the army, i can tell you that i have tremendous admiration for those that have made the decision to serve this country in uniform. the talents of these men and women and the innovative programs at georgetown's new institute of women, peace and security underscore for me the university's leadersh
are struggling during this financial crisis. we get calls related to those. we are trying to educate homeowners about that so they did not become victims in the first place. but a lot of people will lose their homes of the situation. host: christy romero, special inspector general for tarp. the question about the teeth -- question of to this executive pay, if treasury signed off on it, what can sigtarp really do? guest: we make recommendations to treasury and a half to be dealt with. we also report to congress. we send these reports to congress and congress helps put teeth in it. but a ultimately we have a lot of recommendations that are not implemented and they need to be. this is an example that shows how bad it can be a treasury does not implement the recommendation. i am looking forward to a new secretary of treasury coming in to talk about those recommendations and changes that can be made. and we will not give up. we will look at 2013 pay. we will not stop. because alternately we are here to protect taxpayers. host: amelia, ohio. democrats' line. caller: how are you? my question is about
to come to the country, to escape and get an education and level playing field can transform lives. escaping conflict and hardship is one thing, picking a home is another. we are a country that embres justice, we reward fairness, we are a nation of laws. the poorest of the poor has the sametanding in court as the richest of the rich. we believe in the even application of the law because law provides order, structure, predictability and security. and what we cannot become is a nation where the law is enforced selectively or not at all. what we cannot become, mr. chairman, where laws are applied to some of the people some of the time. the president from time to time, mr. chairman, sayshat he want a country where everyone plays by the same rules. with respect, they aren't called rules in this country, they're called laws. anea of us takes an oath to enforce them, including those with which we may disagree. because when theaw was ignored or applied in an uneven way, we see erosion of the foundation upon which this republic was built. and make no mistake, mr. chairman, as surely as one
of education is to all of those things at their core is the notion that we want the same for the kids of bridgeport as the kids in greenwich. there's an awful lot more that unites us than divides us which will make this cars we all serve in live up to the ability in the qualities of the republic. thank you very much. >> congresswoman. >> good morning, everyone. i was elected to congress about a year-and-a-half ago from california. i represent a district of los angeles. my whole life i am the mother, grandmother, i have worked in the private sector. i have my teaching credential, or to the public sector. my whole life by solve problems. i thought i was uniquely qualified to come to congress because we would be solving problems. frustrating moving from one crisis to the next which between you and me have been man-made, and i mean that -- [laughter] and the moderator is going to give her thoughts on that one. man-made crises, and it the worst problem in our country is the fact that congress cannot belong then that is the worst place we can be. we have so many problems in this country, no
strategic investments in education, science, research and critical infrastructure necessary to compete in the global economy. the speaker pro tempore: the house will be in order. the house will be in order. the gentlewoman from pennsylvania is recognized for five minutes. ms. schwartz: thank you. i rise in opposition to this bill and to offer the final amendment that will not kill the bill or send it back to committee. if adopted, the bill, as amended, will immediately proceed to final passage. this amendment rejects the rigid partisan view presented in this legislation that deficit reduction must be achieved by spending cuts alone regardless of the consequences. moving from one crisis to another and failing to meet our responsibilities as republicans have done time and time again has hurt our economic growth. most recently in december, our economy contracted for the first time in three years. as a result of delayed action by republican leadership in the house. this amendment makes clear there is a better way. it recognizes that our nation faces serious financial challenges. we agree,
a real education and in the last two years, i've gotten a chance to work on senate races around the country. i did the east and there were two of us and i did wisconsin east so i have a full half of the country for the 2012 cycle. it was a fascinating two years to be in politics. i would echo what marlon said that campaigns matter. i would love to talk about that even with a gigantic influx of money, the basic fundamental elements of campaigns still very much matter. i actually think there is an inverse relationship to the amount of money that comes in. i think the more television commercials we have, the more media get back its permit people, the more important it becomes to adhere to the basics and remember you have to come to the race with the right candidate for the wright state for the right time and not forget those things in an effort to push somebody in who you think might not win. i love my time at the dscc are started in 2011 and my first day was the week after we had essentially recruited now senator joe donnelly into the race in indiana. he was the first race that i
cancel your rent, potentially you cancel your apartment, you sell your car, you cancel education classes. there's a human aspect to this, and now we postpone it and they're still there. so the effects are felt even now. >> ok. i guess that ends my time. senator inhofe. >> thank you, mr. chairman. i think the skunk is about to arrive at the picnic, but i'd like to share a couple of things, first to clarify some things to make sure we all understand things that are facts. the national military command center -- let me get my timer going here -- at the pentagon after receiving the mish reports of the incident from the state department, notified the office of the secretary of defense and joint staff. this information quickly passed onto the two of you, is that correct? >> correct. >> general hamm, i have a great deal of respect for general hamm and his two predecessors after we developed africom. that was somewhat significant in that effort. of course, africom, with the exception of egypt, has the continent and has the control of that. it would have operational control of the d.o.d. assets i
question to you is, knowing your background, knowing your education, can i have your word that you're going to be very forthcoming with this committee to speak truth to power, to speak truth about power? >> truthfulness was a value that was put into me in my home in new jersey. it still is to this day. honesty is the best policy. none of us are perfect human beings. i will say i will be honest with this committee and do everything possible to immediate your needs and requirements. i know your a proud senator of one of the jewels in the committee which resides in maryland. it would be my objective to make the c.i.a. your favorite intelligence agency. >> i think you're pushing your luck. thank you very much. thank you very much. >> senator eleven. >> thank you for your willingness to serve here. my question is this, in your opinion does water boarding constitute torture? >> the attorney general has referred to water boarding as torture. many people have referred to it as torture. as you well know and we've had the discussion the term torture has a lot of implications. it is something that sho
, a lot of the measures we are using do not really make any sense, like education data, which ignore the actual computer spread and the gap between those data and reality. you have gdp data in your report, but obviously, nobody checked to see if the gdp per capita data you are using trucks between international andization, which have a 2 to 1 different. -- tracks between international organizations, which had a two to one difference. if we do not track the effectiveness, does it do any good to have measures of the effectiveness? >> ok, where we start? [laughter] let me try to deal with the first question. and then i will get to the multi part question. on the intangible benefits, yes, we do recognize there are some. but what i was trying to say that if there are intangible benefits for a program or policy, they should be articulated. we should find out after we go into the arctic -- into the audit. i recall an instance where we were doing an audit the guy said, oh, our purpose is to do this and this. and we said, we ask you when we did the audit were your reasons work and you gave th
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14